Andrew Weil, M.D.

19 04 2012

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For nearly 15 years I have appreciated the wisdom and knowledge of Dr. Andrew Weil, an American author and physician. I like him because he is willing to incorporate alternative modalities into mainstream healthcare. He has been named one of Time Magazines top 25 most influential people in America and one of the top 100 most influential people in the world. He’s also a big man who looks a bit like Santa Claus which endears me to him quite a bit.

So it is with great interest that I follow his musings on Facebook. So do 93,000 other people. He was recently at a Health and Nutrition Conference in Boston and shared these interesting thoughts online:

“according to the CDC, half the cases of chronic disease in the US are diet-related.”

“From the morning session of the Nutrition and Health Conf. in Boston: Consumption of soybean oil (usually labeled “vegetable oil” and common in fried foods and cheap baked goods) has risen 1,000 percent over the last 100 years – a worrisome trend for American health.”

And this shocking fact:
“Running four miles daily, for seven days, burns the calories of one fast-food meal.”. Reason enough to stay away from that stuff.
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Follow Dr.Weil on Facebook at Facebook.com/DrWeil

Follow me on Facebook at Facebook.com/thejohnnygee

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Enjoying the Burn

1 04 2012

After a 15+ year break from lifting weights, I’m finally  back.  Adjustable dumbbells in hand and an adjustable  weight bench being shipped as I type this.  Over the years, I have really missed lifting.  But lets face it, when you’re hauling over 400 pounds around each day, the last thing you want to do is pick up anything else heavy.  Now that I’ve begun to start losing weight, I definitely feel an increase of energy and my body wants to be more active.  It’s true what they say, a body in motion tends to stay in motion.  For a long time my body wanted to rest and without changing my diet and my mindset I could never have sustained any type of serious changes when it came to increasing my physical activity.

There are definitely times I falter.   My treadmill has become “the dreadmill”.  Even with built in cable TV, I detest the thing.  So you can imagine how happy I was after weeks of waiting when the dummbells finally arrived.  I then did a very, very stupid thing.  I began lifting with them like I had never taken all of those years off.  I essentially attempted to pick up where I left off.  And for the next 4-5 days, I could not straighten either of my arms.  Before lifting, I had a romantic notion of what muscle burn felt like but it ended up being something much different afterwards.  This was a painful reminder that it takes dedication AND PATIENCE to get where you want to be.

I’ve since dialed the workouts back a little.  Maybe not even back but rather i’ve dialed them “in”.  I’ve learned that lifting can be just as intense if we focus on isolating the muscles we are working on.  Squeezing the muscle before and at the end of the rep and keeping that tension throughout the rep can be as effective as doing multiple sets of less controlled lifting.  In fact, from my experience it is more effective.

Frequency of reps is not more important than quality of reps. I still get an awesome burn.  I’m just not spending the better part of a week recovering.

I’ve also relearned something that I must have forgotten – that when reaching the point of muscle failure, simple tasks like drinking a glass of water can be challenging.  When you cannot bring a glass of water fully to your lips without it pouring out all over you = it is a sign of an intense workout.

 








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